Stories of Inspiration

Stories of Inspiration



Q: What was the highlight of your CAF career for you and your family?
 
A: Travel was important to our family, so the highlights for us were travel and postings. We had an OUTCAN where I worked for NATO in Germany, so that experience was unique.  
 
My time on the flight line was also really important to me. Being immersed with people all the time was amazing. I also enjoyed human rights investigations because it was an underlying passion that I hadn’t discovered in myself.
 
Q: As a follow-up to that, what has been the highlight of your veteran family life so far?
 
A: A slower pace. That’s been the highlight for me. Just slowing everything down and spending more time together. It’s really nice to stop and smell the roses. 
 
Q: What did you do to ensure you had a successful release? 
 
A: The first thing I did was read the Transition Guide. It’s a really good guide that tells you what to focus on and when. I reached out to people and resources when I needed to. I also watched the transition video on the DLN. I made sure I knew what I needed to do and gave myself enough time to do it. 
 
Q: Are there any resources that really helped you through your release? 
 
A: Transition Guide, absolutely. The Veterans Affairs website was super helpful to me because I was pursuing education. Writing a resume was something that I needed help with, and help was easy to get.
 
It was also helpful to have many outlets to talk to people. I have the MFRC for a family outlet and the Transition Centre for the practical piece. You have a whole network around you once you actually start talking to people. 
 
Q: If you could give one piece of advice to releasing members, and one to family members, what advice would you say?
 
A: Members, don’t leave it to the last minute. Explore what you need to do six months ahead of time. The most important piece is pacing yourself. Give yourself time to settle into your new life. I went from a go-go-go lifestyle to all of a sudden needing to figure out what was important to me. Slowing down has been the most challenging and rewarding part of this retirement. 
 
Families – communicate. Really communicate. I think back to the Psychological Aspects of Release briefing at the SCAN – that workbook was really important in our family. Identify what your expectations are as a family and what family members should do when they feel left out of the [release] process.