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FORCE

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FORCE

FORCE is an acronym for Fitness for the Operational Requirements of CAF Employment.
 
The requirements of the FORCE Evaluation were derived from the operational demands of all types of missions in which the CAF has taken part in the last 20 years, including aid of the civil power (assisting during riots or disturbances of the peace), natural disaster relief, humanitarian assistance, and security and combat operations.
 
The FORCE Evaluation was developed to update and validate new common military tasks. DFit looked at more than 400 tasks performed by Canadian military personnel in all environments over the past 20 years. Using the data collected the research team developed a revised fitness component of the minimum operational standard required by Universality of Service that is based on the following six common tasks required of all CAF members:
 
Escape to cover

Pickets and wire carry

Sandbag fortification

Picking and digging

Vehicle extrication

Stretcher carry
 

The FORCE Evaluation is a much more straightforward test to assess CAF member’s ability to perform the physiological requirements of the common tasks. The four components of the FORCE Evaluation were designed to replicate some of the lifting and movement patterns found in the six common tasks.
 
Each of the four test items is directly linked to physical challenges that CAF members may encounter on operations. The FORCE Evaluation accurately predicts CAF members’ ability to meet the Minimum Physical Fitness Standard using simple simulations and minimal equipment.
 
Sandbag Lift
Intermittent Loaded Shuttles
20 metre Rushes
Sandbag Drag
 
The test standards are derived from the minimal acceptable standards on the six common tasks. These components were found to be the strongest predictors of performance with more accuracy than the classic endurance run or push-ups and sit-ups.
 
The FORCE Evaluation will be introduced on 1 April 2013 as part of a one-year transition and training period. Between 1 April 2013 and 31 March 2014 all CAF personnel will be required to attempt the FORCE Evaluation. If they meet the standard, it will count as their fitness evaluation for the next 365-day period. If not, they will be required to attempt the CF EXPRES before their current evaluation expires. CAF personnel who fail the CF EXPRES Test will be dealt with in accordance with DAOD 5023-2.
 
Effective 1 April 2014, the CF fitness policy and DAOD 5023-2 will be updated.
 
After 1 April 2014, the CF EXPRES Test will be officially replaced by the FORCE Evaluation.
 
CAF members who cannot attempt a trial evaluation during FY 13/14 due to a temporary medical category will have an opportunity to familiarise themselves with and attempt the FORCE Evaluation prior to an official attempt in FY 14/15. However, until they have completed the FORCE Evaluation, they will not have a valid fitness profile.
As of 1 April 2014, CAF members will no longer be able to have their fitness evaluated through the Step Test or modified protocol. Instead, members with medical limitations will require re-evaluation by their CAF primary care provider as to their ability to safely perform either the FORCE Evaluation or the Six Common Military Tasks directly.
 
The Army has been engaged throughout the FORCE Program and are committed to adopting the FORCE Evaluation as their annual fitness test. The Battle Fitness Test may continue to be used as a training or readiness tool, but the FORCE Evaluation will be the fitness standard for Army, Navy, and Air Force personnel.
 
FORCE Testing Protocol & Sequence
 
CAF personnel are required to attempt the FORCE Evaluation in FY 13/14 regardless of their CF EXPRES test expiry date. For PER purposes, EXPRES test results will expire on the date listed on the member’s most recent DND 279 CF EXPRES Program form.
 
All CF EXPRES results from FY 13/14 will be valid for 365 days only, regardless of the level achieved.
 
TRAINING SUPPORT
For training support please visit www.dfit.ca and generate a training program. If you require any additional support in understanding the exercises please do not hesitate to contact the base PSP staff Also our daily PT classes will be integrating aspects of the new FORCE protocols.

CANFORGENS (DWAN ONLY)
http://vcds.mil.ca/vcds-exec/pubs/canforgen/2013/038-13_e.asp
 
FORCE WEBSITE (FOR QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS) WWW.CFPSA.COM/FORCEPROGRAM
 
EVALUATION SEQUENCE AND MANDATORY REST & MINIMUM STANDARDS
The order for the FORCE Evaluation is as follows:
 
Warm-up Standardized & Mandatory
Sandbag Lift
Min 5 min rest period
30 reps in 3 mins 30 secs or less
Intermittent Loaded Shuttles
Min 5 min rest period
5 mins 21 secs or less
Sandbag Drag Complete 20 m drag without stopping
20 metre Rushes
Min 5 min rest period
 51 secs or less
 
Cool-down 
In the event that the evaluation is terminated or if the participant does not meet the standard, the participant can choose to re-do the test item after a 5 minute rest period (for a maximum of two trials per test item).
 
DRESS REQUIREMENTS
The dress requirements for the FORCE Evaluation is standard PT kit or as directed. Knee pads may be worn for the 20 metre Rushes if desired.

PRELIMINARY INSTRUCTIONS
The evaluator shall distribute preliminary instructions to the participants a minimum of 48 hours prior to the start of the FORCE Evaluation. These instructions shall include the following points:
  • Do not eat 2 hours prior to the evaluation.
  • Do not consume caffeine or nicotine 2 hours prior to the evaluation.
  • Do not exercise 6 hours prior to the evaluation.
  • Do not consume alcohol 6 hours prior to the evaluation.
  • Wear appropriate PT kit.
Upon completion of the FORCE Evaluation, the participant is to remain in the testing area and maintain an active recovery period/cool down until all personnel within the group have completed the evaluation. An active recovery period/cool down shall include walking and hydration.
 
1.  SANDBAG LIFT PROTOCOL
Materials handling, such as the use of sandbags, are important aspects of military service. This test component is designed to assess participants' physical capability with military materials handling tasks. The sandbag weighs 20 kg and may represent a variety of environmental or trade-specific materials.
  • The participant stands behind one of the sandbags while facing the wall. They remain standing until the evaluator gives the “3, 2, 1, Go” command.
  • On the “3, 2, 1, Go” command, the participant squats down, picks up the first sandbag and lifts the sandbag to touch inside the box located 91.5 cm above the floor. If the sandbag is not horizontal when it touches the wall, the bottom of the sandbag must touch at least above the bottom line of the box located on the wall.
  • The participant must grasp the sandbag by both ends. If the participant grasps the sandbag's straps and eyelet, the lift will not be counted.
  • Once the participant touches the sandbag inside the box located on the wall, they can release the sandbag and let it fall to the floor.
  • The participant then shifts sideways so that both feet completely cross the centre line. Then, they position their body in front of the vertical line.
  • The participant picks up the second sandbag and touches it inside the box located on the wall before releasing it and shifting sideways back over the centre line to the first sandbag.
  • The participant will perform 30 repetitions.
  • Improper lifts will not count.
  • The sandbags can be repositioned or replaced for safety concerns at the evaluator's discretion.
  • The time to completion is recorded to the nearest second.
The participant must not throw the sandbag at the wall. The participant must have contact with the sandbag when it touches the wall. Otherwise, the lift will not be counted.
 
2.  INTERMITTENT LOADED SHUTTLES PROTOCOL
Carrying objects is a common task with a variety of military applications, as equipment and supplies need to be moved from location to location. This test is designed to measure the participant’s ability to perform repeated carries.
  • The participant is not permitted to touch the sandbag until the evaluator gives the “3, 2, 1, Go” command.
  • The countdown will begin once the participant is standing behind the start line. On the “3, 2, 1, Go” command, the participant picks up the sandbag and carries it to the opposite end of the 20 m course, around the cone, and back to the start line.
  • The participant must walk when carrying the sandbag. (*Walking= At least one foot remains in contact with the floor at all times).
  • The participant can carry the sandbag using any safe technique of their choice, including the use of the straps or tie.
  • The participant must place at least one foot on or over the start line before dropping the sandbag behind the start line, outside the 20 m zone.
  • The participant must not throw the sandbag.
  • The evaluator must not reposition the sandbag to move it closer to the 20 m line. The participant must pick up the sandbag from wherever they dropped it behind the line.
  • Once the participant has dropped the sandbag past the start line, the participant performs an unloaded trip to the opposite end of the 20 m course, around the cone, and back to the start line.
  • The participant repeats alternating loaded and unloaded shuttles for a total of 5 sets (each set equals one loaded shuttle and one unloaded shuttle). The participant completes a total of 400 m.
  • The participant is permitted to set the sandbag down at any point to rest. However, their recorded time will continue to elapse during any rest periods.
  • The evaluator stops the clock once the participant crosses the 20 m line at the end of their final set.
  • The time to completion is recorded to the nearest second.
 Running is permitted during the unloaded trips only.
  
3.  20 METRE RUSHES PROTOCOL
The purpose of the 20 metre Rushes is to assess the participant’s ability to move quickly over short distances while changing body positions every 10 m. This test is a simulation of the common task, Escape to Cover, in the form of a sprint agility test with no equipment. 
  • The participant starts the test by lying on the floor in the prone position at one end of the 20 m course. The participant lies facing the opposite end, with their shoulders and hands behind the start line. The participant's hands shall be raised off the floor, and their feet shall remain on the floor.
  • The participant remains in the starting position until the evaluator gives the ‘‘3, 2, 1, Go’’ command.
  • On the command ‘‘3, 2, 1, Go’’, the participant gets up off the floor and sprints to the 10 m line.
  • At the 10 m line, the participant touches one foot on or over the line, and then gets down into the prone position with shoulders and hands behind the line.
  • Once the participant is in the prone position, they must lift their hands off the floor (referred to as a hand release). The feet shall remain on the floor.
  • The participant must then get up and sprint another 10 m to the 20 m line. At the 20 m line, the participant touches one foot on or over the line, and then gets down into the prone position with shoulders and hands behind the line. The participant shall then perform another hand release.
  • The participant shall then get up, turn around, and sprint back to the 10 m line. At the 10 m line, repeat d, e, f and g.
  • If the participant does not touch 20 m line with at least one foot, the evaluator will call out “Touch the line” to indicate that the participant must touch the line with at least one foot.
  • Any time the participant does not perform a hand release, the evaluator will call “Hands” to indicate that the participant has not performed a proper hand release.
  • The participant will repeat the process of running back and forth until they have covered 4 x 20 m and completed seven hand releases.
  • The participant can wear knee pads for this evaluation.
  • The evaluator stops the clock once the participant crosses the 20 m line after completing 80m.
  • The time to completion is recorded to the nearest second.
The participant is not permitted to dive into the prone position at any point during the test. The participant must move to and from the prone position with control.
 
4.  SANDBAG DRAG PROTOCOL
Pulling strength is an important component of many common military tasks. This test is designed to evaluate the participant's ability to drag a load continuously over a 20 m distance.
  • The first row of "dragging" sandbags is placed behind the 20 m line.
  • The participant picks up the "carry" sandbag in a cradle carry (hands underneath) and adjusts the sandbag in the arms as necessary. The participant then walks backwards so that the strap between the "carry" sandbag and the "dragging" sandbags is taut.
  • Ensure that the carabineer on the "carry" sandbag is pointing downwards. Once the strap is taut and any necessary adjustments have been made, the evaluator gives the “3, 2, 1, Go” command and the test begins.
  • The participant shall not use the "carry" sandbag handle or strap to drag the sandbags.
  • Once started, the participant walks backwards, dragging the sandbags to the opposite end of the 20 m course.
  • The participant drags the sandbags, without stopping, until the first row of sandbags touches the 20 m line and the evaluator calls "Clear".
For more info, please call the Fitness Coordinator at 204-765-3000 ext 3899.